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Ross Kemp on Gangs

Monday 1 September 2014

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 3

Belize was the first place I was ever given a hand grenade by a gang member. Ross Kemp. Fuelled by unemployment and a rampant drugs trade, gangs are battling a turf war in the slums. Ross meets the gangs that control the streets and sees a fraction of the weapons that make this city so violent.

Tuesday 2 September 2014

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 3

Belize was the first place I was ever given a hand grenade by a gang member. Ross Kemp. Fuelled by unemployment and a rampant drugs trade, gangs are battling a turf war in the slums. Ross meets the gangs that control the streets and sees a fraction of the weapons that make this city so violent.

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 4

Ross Kemp and his BAFTA winning documentary team travel to Kenya to investigate the Mungiki, an outfit labelled as the most dangerous 'gang' in Africa. Post election violence left thousands dead and over 250,000 homeless, leaving Kenya, once considered the jewel of Africa, on the brink of civil war. It is believed by many that the Mungiki were responsible for the reign of terror. By gaining the trust of the Mungiki, Ross travels to locations then out of bounds to most ordinary Kenyans, let alone foreign reporters. His time with the Mungiki coincides with a bloody government crackdown on the Mungiki. Ross discovers that Kenya is still far from peace as finds himself in the middle of several riots as the Police round up Mungiki members; The film contains an equal amount of fear and trepidation from myself, a lot of violence, a lot of gunfire and I'm told to go home by the police. Ross manages to meet with top Mungiki leaders, who are known to decline interviews. He grills them about a grisly reputation that includes decapitation and torture, but the Mungiki maintain that the government is the real culprit. Ross investigates further and quickly realises the situation is by no means clear-cut. After all, the Mungiki have their origins in spiritualism, denounce alcohol and drug-taking and, most importantly, Kenya's poverty-ridden population are happy with their presence.

Wednesday 3 September 2014

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 4

Ross Kemp and his BAFTA winning documentary team travel to Kenya to investigate the Mungiki, an outfit labelled as the most dangerous 'gang' in Africa. Post election violence left thousands dead and over 250,000 homeless, leaving Kenya, once considered the jewel of Africa, on the brink of civil war. It is believed by many that the Mungiki were responsible for the reign of terror. By gaining the trust of the Mungiki, Ross travels to locations then out of bounds to most ordinary Kenyans, let alone foreign reporters. His time with the Mungiki coincides with a bloody government crackdown on the Mungiki. Ross discovers that Kenya is still far from peace as finds himself in the middle of several riots as the Police round up Mungiki members; The film contains an equal amount of fear and trepidation from myself, a lot of violence, a lot of gunfire and I'm told to go home by the police. Ross manages to meet with top Mungiki leaders, who are known to decline interviews. He grills them about a grisly reputation that includes decapitation and torture, but the Mungiki maintain that the government is the real culprit. Ross investigates further and quickly realises the situation is by no means clear-cut. After all, the Mungiki have their origins in spiritualism, denounce alcohol and drug-taking and, most importantly, Kenya's poverty-ridden population are happy with their presence.

Saturday 6 September 2014

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 3

Belize was the first place I was ever given a hand grenade by a gang member. Ross Kemp. Fuelled by unemployment and a rampant drugs trade, gangs are battling a turf war in the slums. Ross meets the gangs that control the streets and sees a fraction of the weapons that make this city so violent.

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 4

Ross Kemp and his BAFTA winning documentary team travel to Kenya to investigate the Mungiki, an outfit labelled as the most dangerous 'gang' in Africa. Post election violence left thousands dead and over 250,000 homeless, leaving Kenya, once considered the jewel of Africa, on the brink of civil war. It is believed by many that the Mungiki were responsible for the reign of terror. By gaining the trust of the Mungiki, Ross travels to locations then out of bounds to most ordinary Kenyans, let alone foreign reporters. His time with the Mungiki coincides with a bloody government crackdown on the Mungiki. Ross discovers that Kenya is still far from peace as finds himself in the middle of several riots as the Police round up Mungiki members; The film contains an equal amount of fear and trepidation from myself, a lot of violence, a lot of gunfire and I'm told to go home by the police. Ross manages to meet with top Mungiki leaders, who are known to decline interviews. He grills them about a grisly reputation that includes decapitation and torture, but the Mungiki maintain that the government is the real culprit. Ross investigates further and quickly realises the situation is by no means clear-cut. After all, the Mungiki have their origins in spiritualism, denounce alcohol and drug-taking and, most importantly, Kenya's poverty-ridden population are happy with their presence.

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 3

Belize was the first place I was ever given a hand grenade by a gang member. Ross Kemp. Fuelled by unemployment and a rampant drugs trade, gangs are battling a turf war in the slums. Ross meets the gangs that control the streets and sees a fraction of the weapons that make this city so violent.

Sunday 7 September 2014

Ross Kemp on Gangs

Series 4, Episode 4

Ross Kemp and his BAFTA winning documentary team travel to Kenya to investigate the Mungiki, an outfit labelled as the most dangerous 'gang' in Africa. Post election violence left thousands dead and over 250,000 homeless, leaving Kenya, once considered the jewel of Africa, on the brink of civil war. It is believed by many that the Mungiki were responsible for the reign of terror. By gaining the trust of the Mungiki, Ross travels to locations then out of bounds to most ordinary Kenyans, let alone foreign reporters. His time with the Mungiki coincides with a bloody government crackdown on the Mungiki. Ross discovers that Kenya is still far from peace as finds himself in the middle of several riots as the Police round up Mungiki members; The film contains an equal amount of fear and trepidation from myself, a lot of violence, a lot of gunfire and I'm told to go home by the police. Ross manages to meet with top Mungiki leaders, who are known to decline interviews. He grills them about a grisly reputation that includes decapitation and torture, but the Mungiki maintain that the government is the real culprit. Ross investigates further and quickly realises the situation is by no means clear-cut. After all, the Mungiki have their origins in spiritualism, denounce alcohol and drug-taking and, most importantly, Kenya's poverty-ridden population are happy with their presence.